Articles

If You Haven’t Been Regularly Reviewing Your Estate Plan, Start When You Hit 60

How frequently you should review your estate plan depends on how old you are and whether there has been a significant change in your circumstances. If you are over age 60 and you haven't updated your estate plan in many decades, it's almost certain that you need to update your documents. After that, you should

A Tax Break for Day Care for Elderly Dependents

Paying for day care is one of the biggest expenses faced by working adults with young children, a dependent parent, or a child with a disability, but there is a tax credit available to help working caregivers defray the costs of day care (called "adult day care" in the case of the elderly). In order to qualify

Do I Need to Cash In My Annuities if I Go Into a Nursing Home?

Q: I have two annuities. If my wife or I need to go into a nursing home, would we have to cash in the annuities to apply toward nursing home expenses? I have been told that, because the annuities are considered insurance policies, we would not need to cash them in for nursing home expenses.

Make Sure Your Plan Beneficiary Choices Are Up to Date

Many people periodically update their wills or other estate plans, but don't update who will receive distributions from their retirement plans (such as IRAs and 401(k)s) upon their deaths. Every year you should review your entire estate plan, and the review should include retirement plan "beneficiary designations" to make sure they aren't outdated. The following

Window Closing for Couples to Use ‘Claim Now, Claim More Later’ Social Security Strategy

Spouses who are turning full retirement age this year are the last group who can choose whether to take spousal benefits or to take benefits on their own record. The strategy, used by some couples to maximize their benefits, will not be available to people turning full retirement age after 2019.

Am I Legally Required to Support My Adult Child with Disabilities? Maybe.

By Patricia Kalla Zonnenberg The New York Times Magazine's weekly The Ethicist column recently explored a difficult question that may challenge many parents of adult children with special needs. The Ethicist helps people sort out the morality of the choices they have. In "May I Cut My Daughter Out of My Life?", an anonymous parent writes that his or